Why Do Serious Health Problems Encounter Younger and Younger Victims?

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The two scariest health problems nowadays are Cancer and Cholesterol. There are several symptoms to alarm us for Cancer, while cholesterol is considered as a silent killer because it shows no obvious symptoms nor pain. High cholesterol levels even occurs in
children with a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke as it’s passed on from parents to their children and grandchildren.

200 out of 500 people worldwide surfer high cholesterol levels from a minor genetic condition called FH, familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic mutations which raised, the bad cholesterol, LDL (Low Density Lipoproteins) little by little and at the end it’s resulting a very high LDL cholesterol levels, the leading cause of premature or early heart attacks, before the age of 55 in men or before the age of 65 in women.

FH mutation occurs in one of three different genes which instruct removal of the excess LDL from the bloodstream. LDL cholesterol is attached to ‘receptor’ sites on the targeted cells. A gene, the LDLR gene controls the production of these receptors. Most FH is due to a mutation of the LDLR gene that changes the way the receptors develop, either in number or structure caused LDL to be well absorbed into cells and remains circulating in the blood. The excess of LDL cholesterol buildup plaque deposits in the walls of the arteries. Over time, these deposits keep growing and narrowing the artery, disturbing the bloodstream. When the blocked artery creates rough edges and damage the plaques, the break off piece will travel with the blood, causing a clot and obstructing blood vessels, which rapidly can block the artery. When the plaque builds up inside a coronary artery, it blocks the blood flow to the heart, causing a heart attack as the heart is lack of oxygen from the blood.

There are more than 1,500 different known mutations in FH and a gene test is a must to find out the correct treatment. The FH gene test costs about $1,000. There is no cure for FH. The treatment is only to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease and heart attack.


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